HomeAnimalsIn the South-African bush, a playful baby rhino bounces and skips along...

In the South-African bush, a playful baby rhino bounces and skips along the road.

During a safari tour in St-Lucia, South Africa, the happy rhino calf was sighted. The young rhino bounced around like a spring lamb as he sprinted ahead of his mother’s heavy footsteps (but a lot more serious).

Robyn Bamber, a safari tour leader, was able to capture some amazing photographs of the baby animal leaping and posing for the camera. She had discovered the rhinos at the end-of-a Heritage Tours & Safaris half-day driving safari in the South African bush.

The adorable baby rhino, weighing an estimated 42 kilograms, leapt and kicked before charging towards Bamber and her guests. At the same time, his 1.8-ton mother gave him a proud look.

The bouncy newborn rhino practices charging at the safari tour group of people.

Credit:- Robyn Bamber
Credit: Robyn Bamber
Credit: Robyn Bamber

The small one got within 1.5 meters of the truck and gave a satisfied snort before turning on its footsteps and retreating into the forest. His daring stunt certainly caught the tourists off guard!

Credit: Robyn Bamber
Credit: Robyn Bamber

“Keep an eye on this, Mum!” As he gambols in the South African sun, the baby rhino spins on its hind legs.

Credit: Robyn Bamber

“The little rhino astonished me at first glimpse. Then I frantically searched for my camera.” Robyn Bamber remarked, “He kept the guests and myself amused and laughing.”

“As the little rhino rushed ahead of us, the female rhino began to move up the road away from us.” “The tiny rhino then charged right at us, as if to say, ‘Mum, keep an eye on this,'” Bamber said.

Credit:- Robyn Bamber
Credit: Robyn Bamber
Credit: Robyn Bamber
Credit: Robyn Bamber

At the turn of the century, Africa and Asia were home to 500,000 rhinos. However, by 1970, the population had plummeted to 70 000 rhinos, with only about 27,000 rhinos remaining in the wild today. Due-to decades of poaching for their horns & habitat devastation, few rhinos can live outside of national parks and reserves. The black rhino, the Sumatran rhino, & the Javan rhino are all critically endangered.

On the illicit market, the horns of animals slaughtered for their horns are bought and sold for a great price. Rhino horns are in high demand in numerous Asian nations due to folk medicine. Wealthy individuals buy it for use in traditional Chinese medicine and other uses, especially in China and Vietnam. Rhino-horns are made of “keratin”, the same material that makes up hair and fingernails, but there isn’t enough evidence to back up assertions that they’re healthy. Rhino horn dagger handles are also in high demand throughout North Africa and the Middle East.

Despite being classified as Near Threatened, southern white rhinos thrive in protected sanctuaries, despite being assumed to be extinct in Africa. Unfortunately, both the Western black rhino and the Northern white rhino have recently been declared extinct in their natural habitats.

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